A Guide to Co-Teaching: Practical Tips for Facilitating Student Learning

| February 24, 2011

Title: A Guide to Co-Teaching: Practical Tips for Facilitating Student Learning

Authors: Villa, Richard A.,  Jacqueline S. Thousand, Ann I. Nevin

Publisher: Corwin Press. CA. 2010.

Call No.: LB1029.T4 V55 2008

From the Publisher:

Learn how to plan and teach collaboratively to improve student learning!

Written by experts in the field, this second edition of the best-selling A Guide to Co-Teaching highlights the benefits and challenges of co-teaching, addressing the No Child Left Behind requirement that all students have access to highly qualified teachers and the IDEA requirement that students with disabilities have access to the general education curriculum.

Practitioners embarking on a collaborative teaching approach will find information on four types of co-teaching models (supportive, parallel, complementary, and team teaching), updated references throughout the text, expanded coverage of Response to Intervention, and an added discussion on the role of paraprofessionals and administrators as partners in co-teaching.

This unique road map leads you through the planning, implementation, and reflection phases with the help of these practical features:

  • Quotes and advice about successes and failures from teachers and students
  • Self-assessments to ensure that goals are met
  • Answers to frequently asked questions
  • Tips for organization and mutual cooperation
  • A glossary of terms

A Guide to Co-Teaching, Second Edition will enable you to build successful, enjoyable co-teaching relationships and create more effective outcomes for your students.

About the Authors:

Richard A. Villa is president of Bayridge Consortium, Inc. His primary field of expertise is the development of administrative and instructional support systems for educating all students within general education settings. Villa is recognized as an educational leader who inspires and works collaboratively with others to implement current and emerging exemplary educational practices. His work has resulted in the inclusion of children with intensive cognitive, physical, and emotional challenges as full members of the general education community in the school districts where he has worked and consulted. Villa has been a classroom teacher, special education administrator, pupil personnel services director, and director of instructional services and has authored 4 books and over 70 articles and chapters. Known for his enthusiastic, humorous style, Villa has presented at international, national, and state educational conferences and has provided technical assistance to departments of education in the United States, Canada, Vietnam, and Honduras and to university personnel, public school systems, and parent and advocacy organizations.

Jacqueline S. Thousand is a professor in the College of Education at California State University, San Marcos, and coordinates the special education professional preparation and master’s programs. She previously taught at the University of Vermont, where she directed Inclusion Facilitator and Early Childhood/Special Education graduate and postgraduate professional preparation programs and coordinated federal grants concerned with inclusion of students with disabilities in local schools. Thousand is a nationally known teacher, author, systems change consultant, and disability rights and inclusive education advocate. She has authored numerous books, research articles, and chapters on issues related to inclusive schooling, organizational change strategies, differentiated instruction and universal design, cooperative group learning, collaborative teaming and teaching, creative problem solving, and positive behavioral supports. Thousand is actively involved in international teacher education and inclusive education endeavors and serves on the editorial boards of several national and international journals.

Ann I. Nevin is professor emerita at Arizona State University and visiting professor at Florida International University. The author of books, research articles, and numerous chapters, Nevin is recognized for her scholarship and dedication to providing meaningful, practice-oriented, research-based strategies for teachers to integrate students with special learning needs. Since the 1970s, she has co-developed various innovative teacher education programs that affect an array of personnel, including the Vermont Consulting Teacher Program, Collaborative Consultation Project Re-Tool sponsored by the Council for Exceptional Children, the Arizona State University program for special educators to infuse self-determination skills throughout the curriculum, and the Urban SEALS (Special Education Academic Leaders) doctoral program at Florida International University. Her advocacy, research, and teaching spans more than 38 years of working with a diverse array of people to help students with disabilities succeed in normalized school environments. Nevin is known for action-oriented presentations, workshops, and classes that are designed to meet the individual needs of participants by encouraging introspection and personal discovery for optimal learning.